Monday, September 22, 2008

Carving

The Headless Horseman : How cool is he!

On Saturday, I went out to the States and hung out with my sister. We got together to engage in what has become an annual ritual for her: styrofoam pumpkin carving. Every year, she carves a couple of pumpkins for a few friends and every year, she just gets better and better at it. This year, I decided to give it a try and I had a ball!

Horton the Pumpkin and a ghostly specter... Woooooooooo

These are the two pumpkins I carved Saturday night. The patterns are from Zombie Pumpkins and are designed by a craft artist named Ryan Wickstrand. He's got some great patterns ranging from very easy, like Horton to difficult, like the Headless Horseman. We had a lot of fun hanging out on Saturday. I can't wait to put my pumpkins in the window and hand out treats to all the tricksters! Is it Halloween yet?

Photo copyright: D.C. Confidential, 09/08

13 comments:

Virginia said...

So you use those pumpkins you buy that have the electric light in them? Way cool! When you said you were going to carve pumpkins I thought you two had gone around the bend. Carving a real one would result in a nasty situation by Halloween. You all solved that problem. First place ribbons on these.

Lori said...

How cool! You did a great job with your pumpkins. I never heard of the styrofoam (sp?)ones before. That's neat!

Dusty Lens said...

Cool carvings! Never heard of styrofoam pumkins though. I have masacred many a pumpkin in the past trying to carve it. I may have to give this a try.

Wayne said...

Only about 39 more sleeps JM.

You did a good job on your carvings. How the heck do you carve styrofoam anyhow? I just picture those little styrofoam crumbs everywhere.

marley said...

These are really good! How well does it work on real pumpkins?

Mo said...

That is so cool.

Petrea said...

Nice work, DC!

D.C. Confidential said...

VJ: These aren't the ones that have a light in them. They're a hollow, styrofoam pumpkin you carve and then you had a battery-powered light or LED to them. I'm going over on Sunday to carve a few more. When I do, I'll photograph the whole process and then post pictures on my overflow blog.


Lori: Most craft stores (Michaels, for example) have them. It's a fun project on a fall afternoon.


Rob: It's a fun way to carve pumpkins and not have them go all moldy and soft on you!


Wayne: Either with an Exacto knife or with a hot knife (a woodburning tool that's been modified and has an Exacto blade installed in it.) The hot knife just melts right through the styrofoam and voile!


Marley: You can use the same patterns on real pumpkins. In the case of a real pumpkin and some of the patterns, though, you don't necessarily cut out holes, as much as you scrape away the rind until you a thin skin of pumpkin left and that glows when you put a candle in it.


Mo: Isn't it, though?


Petrea: Thanks!

Jackie said...

That looks fantastic! Horton especially is very cool!

Arlene said...

Love the pumpkins! You have a very talented sister ;) and I'm glad she is sharing her amazing talents with you! Are you showing off any of Neeners?

D.C. Confidential said...

Jackie: I like Horton, too. He's a little scary, but whimsical all at once, which makes him perfect!


Arlene: I think we'll probably feature some of Janeen's pumpkins in next month's 'Round the Countertop on the family blog. She does a great job on these and it's fun to just hang out with her and watch her work a piece of molded plastic into a delightful decoration!

Maya said...

Wow, you are getting started early! These are really cool shots. Looks like it was a lot of fun.

D.C. Confidential said...

Maya: That's the beauty of styrofoam pumpkins--you can start early and carve often! Bad for the environment, initially, but good for it long-term as you can store and use these over and over again. (Or, at least, that's what I tell myself sans compost.)